A batch of bunuelos for a cozy New Year’s Eve

Angelina LaRue photo BUNDLE UP WITH BUNUELOS A cross between flour tortillas and sopapillas, bunuelos are quite popular to eat on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck in the year ahead, but can be enjoyed all year long.

Angelina LaRue photo
BUNDLE UP WITH BUNUELOS A cross between flour tortillas and sopapillas, bunuelos are quite popular to eat on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck in the year ahead, but can be enjoyed all year long.

Food Bytes

Who’s ready to ring in 2021? I don’t think I know of a soul who isn’t ready to bid farewell to 2020. I do try to focus on some of the wonderful aspects of this past year; there were certainly many things to be thankful for. But I’m also excited to move forward to a time when outings and experiences we used to take for granted will be safe again. I know we all long for that. And for alleviating some of the fear of loved ones falling ill.

A cozy evening with family may just be in store for New Year’s Eve, rather than a gathering until we can live it up next year when circumstances are different. So make the occasion extra special with a batch of bunuelos. 

Bunuelos are kind of a cross between flour tortillas and sopapillas. They are quite popular to eat on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck in the year ahead, but they can be enjoyed all year long. They are typically rolled out into circles but no need to fuss with the exact form. Some of mine have looked like the shape of hands, hearts, and various continents, but they taste just as good in random shapes. 

Serve bunuelos with a warm mug of hot chocolate. I love to brake off a piece of the cinnamon-coated treat to dip in the hot chocolate. It’s a nice way to welcome a new year. Enjoy food made fresh!

Bunuelos

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3/4 cup milk

¼ cup unsalted butter

1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract or other vanilla extract

2 eggs, beaten

1½ cups vegetable oil for frying

1/3 cup granulated sugar mixed with 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon to sprinkle

Mix flour, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon; set aside.

Place milk, butter and vanilla in medium-size saucepan and bring to a slow boil over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from heat.

Temper the beaten eggs with 2 or 3 tablespoons of hot milk mixture before adding the eggs to the rest of the hot milk; this will keep the eggs from cooking in the hot liquid. Whisk together until well blended. Slowly add milk and egg mixture to dry ingredients.

Mix until the dough comes together in a ball. Turn dough onto floured surface and knead 2 to 3 minutes. Divide into 20 balls.

Heat approximately 1 inch of oil in a medium-size skillet over medium heat. Roll dough balls out into 6- to 7-inch circles. 

Drop a small pinch of dough into the oil to if it sizzles. When it is sizzles, fry the bunuelos one at a time. They will bubble in places and begin to brown. Cook first side for 1 to 2 minutes then flip over to brown the other side for about 1 minute. Remove from skillet and stand upright in bowl lined with paper towels.

Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar mixture while still hot. 

Serve at room temperature. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for 3 to 4 days.

Angelina LaRue photo BUNDLE UP WITH BUNUELOS A cross between flour tortillas and sopapillas, bunuelos are quite popular to eat on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck in the year ahead, but can be enjoyed all year long.

Angelina LaRue photo
BUNDLE UP WITH BUNUELOS A cross between flour tortillas and sopapillas, bunuelos are quite popular to eat on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck in the year ahead, but can be enjoyed all year long.

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